the legacy of war: peaceby boris a. bakhmeteff

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  • World Affairs Institute

    The Legacy of War: Peace by Boris A. BakhmeteffAdvocate of Peace through Justice, Vol. 90, No. 3 (March, 1928), p. 192Published by: World Affairs InstituteStable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20661868 .Accessed: 17/06/2014 18:32

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  • 192 ADVOCATE OF PEACE March THE LEGACY OF WAR : PEAOE. By Boris A.

    Bakhmeteff. Pp. 53. Houghton, Mifflin

    Co., Boston, 1927. Price, $2.00.

    The war-time ambassador of Russia to the

    United States delivered this address at Mil

    ton Academy in June, 1927. It was given under the permanent foundation, which was

    established in that school in 1922, in memory of those alumni who gave their lives in the

    World War. The noble and appropriate pur

    pose of the foundation is to provide lectures

    and informal conferences dealing with demo

    cratic responsibilities and the opportunities for leadership in the new day.

    M. Bakhmateff, therefore, traces for his

    young auditors the contrasting conditions in

    Europe and the United States since the war.

    He especially contrasts the unfortunate col

    lective "6tatism" in Russia, with individual

    istic democracy in the United States. Since

    real peace is "a peaceful progress of life"

    internally, rather than mere absence of war,

    he finds greater political health in this coun

    try. We have, he says, attained personality

    among the nations ; we have little to fear

    from subversive doctrines. It remains for

    us to follow up the ideas already begun in

    the way of open diplomacy, patience, good

    will. In these lines America has already

    inaugurated, since the war, a democratic

    doctrine in international behavior which

    holds the seed of future equity and freedom

    for the world.

    BUILDING INTERNATIONAL GOOD WILL. By various writers. Pp. 242. Macmillan Co.,

    New York, 1927. Price, $1.50.

    Here is a well printed, but amazingly in

    adequate, book on its subject. It consists of

    a series of small articles on large topics.

    They are written by Jane Addams and Emily

    Balch jointly, by J. H. Scattergood, Denys P.

    Myers, and others.

    In its historical portions no credit is given to the first workers for peace in this eduntry,

    except in one sentence in the Addams-Balch

    article. There William Ladd, mentioned in

    four words, is called, astonishingly, "of Con

    necticut." Since he was born in New Hamp

    shire, lived in Maine, and, except for a year

    and a half, his peace activities were largely

    centered in either New York or Boston, it

    seems odd that the year and a half of his

    long work which did center in Connecticut

    should have placed him there in the minds of

    these ladies. Of the other articles some are

    strongly pro-League, some non-resistant in

    tone, absolute in doctrine ; many of them

    quite out of date.

    The book is put out by the officers and Executive Committee of the World Alliance

    for International Friendship Through the

    Churches. They claim it to be a "r~sum6 of

    the various constructive methods" which are

    now in use making toward universal peace. The book is, we must repeat, lamentably in

    adequate to its purpose.

    BROTHER JOHN : A TALE OF THE FIRST FRAN

    CISCANS. By Vida D. Scudder. Pp. 336.

    Little, Brown & Co., Boston, 1927. Price,

    $2.50.

    Miss Scudder, Professor of English Litera

    ture at Wellesley College, has felt, with

    many others, that the story of St. Francis

    and his early disciples has somewhat to teach

    the modern world. A close student of the

    thirteenth century, she sees something akin

    to our modern paradoxes in the "varying atti

    tudes of Lady Poverty's friends to questions of property and war." The emphasis on joy is another point which the Franciscans of

    those days have in common with many in

    the modern world, though perhaps today we

    expect happiness to flow from impossible causes.

    The book is not quite a novel, yet it is an

    imaginative and dramatic narrative of the

    absorbing struggles which moved the two

    wings of the Franciscan order immediately after Francis' death.

    Brother John is a lovable and loving Eng lish youth, who leaves his estates in England and becomes a sincere and humble Brother

    Minor, finally a "spiritual, or zealot," and

    dies in prison, singing. Other brothers are

    vivid and living-Brother Bernard, Brother

    Elias, Brother Thomas, Brother Giles, and

    all.

    The sunny Umbrian landscape, with its

    hills, rivers and sky, as also the heavy po litical atmosphere of Rome, are represented in a way to be remembered. Withal, there is

    a sane recognition-Was it Brother John or

    the twentieth-century author?-that poverty, actual avoidance of responsibility, has its

    dangers. It may burden others unfairly. These are still, as they were then, questions, and the answer is not yet.

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    Article Contentsp. 192

    Issue Table of ContentsAdvocate of Peace through Justice, Vol. 90, No. 3 (March, 1928), pp. 131-192Front MatterEditorialsWHY OUR CONFERENCE IN CLEVELAND? [pp. 133-134]A SUCCESSFUL CONGRESS [pp. 135-136]REGRETTABLE [pp. 136-138]MR. BURTON'S RESOLUTION [pp. 138-140]GERMAN SENSE AND SECURITY [pp. 141-142]CATHOLIC ASSOCIATION FOR INTERNATIONAL PEACE [pp. 142-146]A SAMPLE EUROPEAN DIFFICULTY [pp. 146-149]

    WORLD PROBLEMS IN REVIEWSIXTH PAN AMERICAN CONFERENCE AT HAVANA: SUMMARY OF RESULTS [pp. 149-154]THE PROBLEM OF SECURITY [pp. 154-158]FRENCH ARMY REFORM [pp. 158-159]FUTURE OF THE GERMAN REICH [pp. 159-160]TROTSKY'S EXILE TO SIBERIA [pp. 160-162]

    THE ADVOCATE OF PEACE: A Little History [pp. 162-169]SHOULD ANY NATIONAL DISPUTE BE RESERVED FROM ARBITRATION? [pp. 170-173]INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS [pp. 173-175]OUR ARMY [pp. 175-178]A LETTER FROM "BILL" ADAMS [pp. 179-180]GENEVA AND AFTER [pp. 181-184]The Trees That Died in the War [pp. 184-184]INTERNATIONAL DOCUMENTSAN ARBITRATION TREATY: BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND THE FRENCH REPUBLIC, SIGNED AT WASHINGTON ON FEBRUARY 6, 1928 [pp. 185-186]ANGLO-IRAQ TREATY [pp. 186-187]

    News in Brief [pp. 188-190]BOOK REVIEWSReview: untitled [pp. 190-191]Review: untitled [pp. 191-191]Review: untitled [pp. 191-191]Review: untitled [pp. 192-192]Review: untitled [pp. 192-192]Review: untitled [pp. 192-192]