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Ideation Journal

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  • Christine Hogan 640136Semester one 2013

    Virtual EnvironmentsModule one: Ideation

  • RESEARCH- Patterns found in nature.

    1. 2. 3.

    4. 5. 6.

    7. 8. 9.

  • IDEATION1.1- Dahlia

    Dahlias originated in Mexico, Central America and Columbia.In recent years Dahlias have been bred for their perfect symmetry , stricking colour pattern and beauty.

  • IDEATION- 1.1- Analytical Drawings

    SYMMETRY-1. LOCATE A CENTRAL POINT.2. DIVIIDE INTO 8 EVEN QUATERS.3.FIND THE CENTER OF EACH EVEN QUATER & DIVIDE INTO AN ELON-GATED SEMI-CIRCLES- AS REPRESENTED BY DOTTED LINES. 4.THESE PRINCIPAL TENSIONS REPRESENT THE SYMMETRICAL DISTANC-ES BETWEEN EACH QUARTER.

    MOVEMENT-1. FIND A CENTRAL POINT.2. DIVIDE INTO 8 EVEN SECTIONS3. REPRESENT THE DIRECTION/MOVEMENT USING ARROWS.4. THE SIZE OF THE ARROW SHOULD INCREASE WITH EACH NEW LAYER ( AS DOES THE PETTALS ON THE DAHLIA FLOWER)

  • BALANCE-1.LOCATE CENTRE.2. DIVIDE INTO 8 EVEN QUARTERS.3. USE DOTS TO REPRESENT POINTS ALONG FLOWER (FROM END OF ONE PETAL TO NEXT). SHOWING THE OVERAL BALANCE OF THE NATURAL PATTERN.

    Analytical drawing as taught by Kandinsky follows a step by step manner. It is a process of SIMPLIFICATION, ANALYSIS AND TRANS-FORMATION of a given form. While also recognising and questioning the relationship between the laws of art and nature. Analysing how nature uses the basic elements and how the rules of analytical drawing are parallel to the underlying natural principals. There is a strong correla-tion between the idea of nature and its basic natural elements discussed by Kandinsky, and the analysis of natural patterns and pattern formation conducted in week one.The three stages of analytical approach advanced by Kandinsky are as follows:The first stage involves depicting simple forms as flat outline draw-ings, without the use of colour or shading. These diagrams should demonstrate the relations between the horizontals, verticals and diagonals, which represent the axes of the overall form.Secondly one must make the tensions clear. Linear forms repre-sent these tensions; principal tensions should be made clear by using broad line or colour. Dotted lines are then used to indicate the structural network and solid lines are used to represent actual contours. The third stage was termed translation as it advances the as-pects of the second stage towards a freer set of abstract solutions.How the three stages of analytical approach advanced by Kand-insky assisted/directed me when producing my analytical draw-ings.It was through these steps described by Kandinsky I was better able to understand the underlying structural principals behind my natural pattern. I depicted symmetry, balance and movement in the simplest of forms. As flat outline drawings with no shading or colour. In my analytical drawing of movement I made the directional tensions clear by depicting them as arrows, which represent the guiding forces and direction of the natural pattern, similarly my analytical drawing of symmetry each connecting point was represented by a small dot, revealing both the isolation of individ-ual structures and tensions within my found pattern, but also the importance of a cohesive network of parts working as one.

    Poling, Clark (1987): Analytical Drawing In Kandiskys Teaching at the Bauhaus Rizzoli, New York, pp. 107-122

    IDEATION 1.1- 1.3 - Analytical Drawings

  • IDEATION- 1.3- Tooling (recipe) & lecture one reflection

    In lecture one the idea of information presented in a graphical way was illuminated. These graphical repre-sentations clearly expose pattern in everyday life exposing everyday movements through lines. But it was also highlighted that the way in which we display known information is very important as it should have an underlying meaning such as in the specific sequence of elements in the periodic table. I also found the examples of natural patterns particularly interesting. As they are not just discussed as visually interesting structures but mathematical equations with specific formulas. Allowing patterns to be repeated over and very again through following simple rules. For example the tree which follows a process of grow and di-vide. Highlighting the importance of discovering and creating a recipe for our found natural pattern ( Dahlia).

    Benjamin Aranda and Chris Lasch discuss Tooling which they de-scribe as the rules that exist within this hypothetical pre-material state that influence its movement into the realm of material. Which can then be broken down into seven algorithmic techniques which include spiraling, packing, weaving, blending, cracking flocking and tiling.

    TOOLING

    LECTURE ONE

    1. Pick a central point.2.Lightly draw a circle. Plot a point on the circle at X degrees from the origin.3. Plot another point at X degrees from the last point on another circle that is slightly bigger than the previos.4.Repeat step 3.-This will produce a spiral.

    RECIPE

    THIS RECIPE IS BASED INSPIRED BY THE READING TOOLING AND FOLLOWS A SIMILAR RECIPE TO SPIRALLING. ALTHOUGH I HAVE ALREADY PRODUCED A RECIPE FOR BALANCE, SYMMETRY AND MOVEMENT. THIS RECIPE SIMPLIFIES ALL THESE RECIPES INTO ONE BASIC RECIPE. THAT SHOWS THE STRUCTURE OF THE DAHLIA FLOWER IN ITS MOST SIMPLE OF FORMS - THE SPIRALING FROM THE CENTRAL POINT OUTWARDS INCREASING BY ( X) WITH EACH NEW SPIRAL.

  • IDEATION 1.1-1.4 - 3- Dimensional extrusion

    These are the extruded models I made in class inspired by the structures of the Dahlia flower.The three smaller images depict an extrusion of the individual petals of the Dahlia flower. Which involved cutting a piece of paper ( width 1cm & length 5cm) to produce the small-er petal extrusions in the centre and slightly larger patals (length 6cm) on the outskirts. The two larger photographs reveal the second stage of the transformation. And involve the repetition of the structures produced in the first stage into an elongated organic form. This utilised the basic teardrop shape seen in the first extrusion but produce somthing quite different.To make the second extruded structure I used a long strip of paper with a width of 1cm, the second piece was 2cm, the third 3cm and finally the fourth with a width of 4cm. Each attached to the left side to ensure they aligned up. Overall producing a branch like form.

  • IDEATION 1.5 - Emerging form

    STEPS.1.FOLD A4 SHEET OF PAPER INTO A TRIANGLE 2. FOLD IN HALF. 3. FOLD IN FORMING TWO SMALLER TRIANGLES (IMAGE 4) BEND THE TRIANGLE INFRONT OVER THE SECOND TRIANGLE AND APPLY A SMALL AMMOUNT OF GLUE TO HOLD IN PALCE. 4. FOLD THE REMAINING TRIANGLE INTO THE CONE. 5. PULL OUT SIDES ( IMAGE 7) AND USE THESE TO ATTACH FOLLOWING STRUCTURES.

  • IDEATION- 1.5

    DAHLIA-

    After finishing my first two extrusions i felt the teardrop shape needed to be elongated and further explored. Thus my emerging form looks significantly different. But still follows the structure and form of my natural pattern the Dahlia flower. In this model i have used a folded cone shape as my base structure as it can easily be repeated, joined together and then manipulated. As seen in the photographs it first appears as a fan shape. But this can easily be twisted into a cone shape, which shows different pattern, and light depending on which direction it is folded to form the cone and whether the cone is viewed from the top or bottom. Each cone has a pointed tear-drop top similar to the shape of the Dahlias petals.

  • IDEATION 1.5- Rhino model of emerging form.

    EMERGING FORM UNDER LIGHT AND RHINO MODELS.

  • IDEATION 1.7- BALL 2012 : PATTERN FORMATION IN NATURE

    It is through this process of spontaneous pattern formation, as described by Philip Ball, that remarkably beautiful and inspiring forms and natural organisms are produced.

    My pattern is an example of one of these natural wonders that come to be through chemical reactions, natural selection forming an organised structure composed of basic symmetry and repetition.

    The Dahlia has an overall round form, with a large array of curvaceous organic shapes starting from the centre then spreading out-wards, increasing in size with each overlapping piece. It is through the interactions of these single components different structures and behaviours are formed as discussed by (Ball 2012).

    My 3-Dimensional model based on the Dahlia flower followed a simple recipe of repetition of folds. This process of folding and pasting together could be repeated over and over again, to produce an overall cohesive structure. Much like I followed a recipe of folding Ball discusses the recipes nature follows which includes the arrays of elements whether they be chemical small particles or molecules that cohere into clusters (Ball 2012). They all follow a spontaneous pattern formation process that results in self-organised structures.These structures are the result of mathematical analogies and equivalences according to zoologist DArcy Wentworth Thompson.I believe the Fibonacci algorithm plays a role in the formation and mathematical sequence of the Dahlia flower, as it follows a spiralling motion. This mathematical sequence is an example of the computations used by natural structures through the interaction of physi-cal particles.

  • Bah House of Worship-Located in India the Bah House of Worship is a symbol of unity amongst the diversity of different regions. The Lotus flower is considered a scared symbol in all Indian regions, an object that is holy and divine.Fariborz Sahba is the architect behind the Bah House of Worship.Sahba has utilized the shape of the lotus as the construction of the building. Which was then converted into de-finable geometrical shapes and equations used as the basis for structural analysis.Similarly, I used the structure of the Dahlia flower