Community Building Begins with Community Organizing

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<p>title</p> <p>Community Building begins with Community Organizing</p> <p>Amy Sample Ward, NTENDebra Askanase, Community Organizer 2.0Welcome!Amy Sample Ward@amyrswardhttp://nten.orghttp://amysampleward.org</p> <p>Debra Askanase@askdebrahttp://communityorganizer20.com</p> <p>Agenda5 Principles of Community OrganizingPrinciples in Action: Short-Term Community BuildingPrinciples in Action: Long-Term Community BuildingDiscussion and Shared LearningFive community organizing principlesFocus on shared goals and shared ownershipBe transparentGo where the people areCultivate leadersKnow your community</p> <p>Focus on shared goals and shared ownership</p> <p>1.http://www.flickr.com/photos/73645804@N00/1384952210/</p> <p>5Wheres the sweet spot?</p> <p>The next step is finding the sweet spot. To do that, you first identify what your community wants to do what it is coming together around, whether its an event, an action, or a movement. Next, identify what you want to do, what your organizational goals are. Those two wants to do will overlap and that gray area is the sweet spot. Its important to remember that not everything your organization wants to do or achieve, matches up with with your community wants to do, and vice versa. The key is that thats okay! Maybe you provide services, and your community doesnt want to be providing those services, but they are happy you are doing so. And maybe the community wants to endorse a specific candidate, and your organization doesnt. But both the community and your organization want to see certain laws passed, things improved, programs created or groups supported. Thats the sweet spot where you can count on focusing CDSI energy.6</p> <p>2.Be transparent</p> <p>http://www.flickr.com/photos/21771638@N00/5509949256/</p> <p>Transparent in goals, activities, membership, successes, challenges, issues within the community7No short cuts</p> <p>This means don't build it in secret and then "launch" it - regardless of whether its an online space, a program or a campaign. If it is really something that is coming from the community, you cant just take the idea and run; youll want to co-create it from idea to implementation.8No short cuts</p> <p>lead by example: interact with the community the way you want other organizations and the community members to do. Its like the golden rule for community engagement. I like this picture for this point because often mother ducks will bring up the rear, supporting the ducklings and swimming along side them, instead of shooting ahead and expecting them to keep up. 9</p> <p>http://xkcd.com/802/Go where the people are3.</p> <p>11</p> <p>http://www.brooklynmuseum.org/community/foursquare/Be active in the community</p> <p>Being active in the community leads to organizational engagement, creates community, builds followers. If you know your followers are into LBS, then be in that community and reward their activity in unique ways, such as check in 3 times and get an unique BK Art Star Badge. </p> <p>http://epicthanks.org/Be active in the community</p> <p>Tweetsgiving 2010Leverage the power of the online communities and networks, such as with Tweetsgiving. Highlight the work of the community on the home page of the campaign or website. 13http://www.flickr.com/people/nationalwildlifefederation/Be active in the community</p> <p>Leverage the power of the online communities and networks, such as with Tweetsgiving. Highlight the work of the community on the home page of the campaign or website. 14Whos your community?</p> <p>15</p> <p>Cultivate leaders4.16Find voices. Amplify them. No hero worship!Strive to be replaced</p> <p>Striving to be replaced can be a tough one for most everyone. It isnt exactly in our nature but it is key to the ethos of a community builder. One way to work on supporting your community to not need you managing the program, platform, or whatever else is to encourage interaction without you. This touches back on letting the community know itself. If youre making connections and supporting conversations across the network, youre helping the community create strong ties that will not require your time and energy to maintain. 17</p> <p>Strive to be replaced: spotlight leaders</p> <p>Striving to be replaced also means rewarding and spotlighting leaders. Positive reinforcement is one of the best leadership development practices you can build into your work across the board, whether its online or offline, on your facebook page, newsletter, annual fundraiser or neighborhood events. 18Strive to be replaced: share your toolbox</p> <p>Lastly, the only way you can really operate in a way that prepares your community to take over for you is to share your toolbox. This is a lot like operating in public but that you are sharing the tools you use and the strategies you use. You can model behavior all you want but if no one can tell what tools you are using to be so successful, theres no way they can jump in and help man the ship. 19</p> <p>5.Know your community</p> <p>http://www.flickr.com/photos/97447249@N00/2680692974/</p> <p>Know your community: help them know themselves</p> <p>Knowing your community. Part of doing this well is letting your community know itself. That means don't take credit where it isn't yours, highlight the leaders and contributors in the community, and making connections across the network. It also means letting community members connect directly with one another, without going through you.21Know your community: roles</p> <p>Knowing your community also means knowing your role in the ecosystem. Its important, as I mentioned earlier in the strategy steps, to identify what your role or roles are as the organization and stick to them. Once you start spreading out, you squeeze out room for others to grow and develop or even to explore whats possible. Not to mention create far more for yourself!</p> <p>22Know your community: help it grow</p> <p>Knowing your community also means you help it grow. Sometimes that means making mistakes. Hopefully they are tiny and harmless, and that youre there to learn alongside the community. But, its just to say that you are in it just like the community is, and not everything we try in life works smoothly. Instead, design for growth and sustainability from the start with lots of room for feedback, evaluation and iterations to continue developing and redeveloping. The best time to fail is early and openly that way you can learn and build to move forward.</p> <p>23Principles in Action</p> <p>http://www.flickr.com/photos/stignygaard/2728636677/24Principles in Action: a short-term campaignFollow the Leader, part of the Get Hands On series of online campaignsGoals: To inspire people to become involved in community serviceAsking the people who have been identified as service leaders to lead volunteer projects in their communities greater commitment</p> <p>Shared goals and ownershipShared goals: make a difference in your community26http://community.handsonnetwork.org/</p> <p>Shared goals and ownershipGoal = develop community. The goal is to be able to plug in to a community of people that are dedicated to service in order to support the individuals own service. Goal = move people to action. The end result of FTL will be to increase and mobilize the number of Americans involved in volunteer service, to identify and connect with volunteer leaders within their communities, and to help those who want to get involved in volunteering implement impactful projects in their neighborhoods.</p> <p>Sharing: sharing commitments to service on Facebook and Twitter, community forums where people can share their commitments to service and get feedback from the community, and space for users to blog about their service commitments and include photos and video from their projects. Were most excited about the members journals. Interact (Forum comments), Co-create (Community ideas) http://community.handsonnetwork.org/</p> <p>TransparencyGoal = develop community. The goal is to be able to plug in to a community of people that are dedicated to service in order to support the individuals own service. Goal = move people to action. The end result of FTL will be to increase and mobilize the number of Americans involved in volunteer service, to identify and connect with volunteer leaders within their communities, and to help those who want to get involved in volunteering implement impactful projects in their neighborhoods.</p> <p>Game aspects: a prize structure including grants for players favorite charities and trips to Washington, DC, New Orleans, and Atlanta.Sharing: sharing commitments to service on Facebook and Twitter, community forums where people can share their commitments to service and get feedback from the community, and space for users to blog about their service commitments and include photos and video from their projects. Were most excited about the members journals. INTEGRATION CATEGORIESShow (FB, Twitter, widget), Share (Like button), Interact (Forum comments), Co-create (Community ideas) Go where the people arehttp://community.handsonnetwork.org/</p> <p>Leadership developmenthttp://community.handsonnetwork.org/</p> <p>http://community.handsonnetwork.org/</p> <p>Leadership developmentKnow your communityhttp://community.handsonnetwork.org/</p> <p>Let them meet each other, and organize themselveshttp://community.handsonnetwork.org/</p> <p>Know your communityLet them meet each other, and organize themselvesPrinciples in Action: building a community prior to the campaignTo Mama With Love 2011</p> <p>Goals:Raise money for Epic ChangeCreate a community to support a fundraising campaign and Epic Change long-term </p> <p>Shared goals and ownership</p> <p>Shared goals and ownership</p> <p>Shared goals and ownership</p> <p>Transparency</p> <p>Transparency</p> <p>Go where the people are</p> <p>Leadership development</p> <p>Know your communityRoles, help it grow42</p> <p>Know your communityHelp it grow43Principles in Action: a long-term community building350.orgGoal: To build a global grassroots movement to solve the climate crisis.Create opportunities for grassroots efforts, local communities, and individuals to take action and advocate for climate policy and change</p> <p>Shared goals and ownership</p> <p>Transparency</p> <p>Go where the people are</p> <p>Leadership development</p> <p>Know your communityPrinciples in Action: community building in real-timeChain ReactionGoal: The Chain Reaction Networks helps individuals and organisations to connect together.Create offline and online opportunities to bring individuals, organizations, governments, etc. together to make more lasting collaborations for change</p> <p>Shared goals and ownership</p> <p>Transparency</p> <p>Go where the people are</p> <p>Leadership development</p> <p>Know your community</p> <p>Questions? http://www.flickr.com/photos/33914386@N08/3230910546/Discussion and shared learningFocus on shared goals and shared ownershipBe transparentGo where the people areCultivate leadersKnow your communityResources and linkshttp://socialbysocial.comhttp://wearemedia.orghttp://www.communityorganizer20.com/2011/05/03/how-to-create-love-online-case-study/http://www.communityorganizer20.com/2011/02/24/follow-the-leader-innovative-social-media-activism/http://amysampleward.org/2010/05/07/guest-post-on-online-community-report-sustainable-community-building/http://amysampleward.org/2009/08/06/online-community-building-gardening-vs-landscaping/http://amysampleward.org/2011/01/20/diy-community-engagement-metrics/http://amysampleward.org/2011/05/18/crowdsourcing-vs-community-sourcing-whats-the-difference-and-the-opportunity/</p> <p>Image creditsSlide 5: http://www.flickr.com/photos/73645804@N00/1384952210/Slide 7: http://www.flickr.com/photos/21771638@N00/5509949256/Slide 8: http://www.flickr.com/photos/zenobia_joy/2708679303/ Slide 9: http://www.flickr.com/photos/cesarastudillo/158254288/ Slide 10: http://xkcd.com/802/Slide 11: http://www.flickr.com/photos/ivanwalsh/3677282034/ Slide 15: http://www.flickr.com/photos/rtadlock/3055707715/ Slide 16: Slide 17: http://www.flickr.com/photos/m0les/4163976843 Slide 18: http://www.flickr.com/photos/fernando/304012148/ Slide 19: http://www.flickr.com/photos/furryscalyman/312210315/ Slide 20: http://www.flickr.com/photos/97447249@N00/2680692974/Slide 21: http://www.flickr.com/photos/78428166@N00/3868167989/ Slide 22: http://www.flickr.com/photos/rene_ehrhardt/2391554020/ Slide 23: http://www.flickr.com/photos/jaaronfarr/666261449/ Slide 24: http://www.flickr.com/photos/stignygaard/2728636677/Slide 57: http://www.flickr.com/photos/33914386@N08/3230910546/</p> <p>Thank you!Amy Sample Ward, NTENamy@nten.orghttp://nten.orgAlsohttp://amysampleward.orgamy@amysampleward.org Twitter: @amyrswardDebra Askanase, Community Organizer 2.0debra@communityorganizer20.comwww.communityorganizer20.comTwitter: @askdebra</p>