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FIONA WHOLEY | 2015 E LLERBE A PPLICATION

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Ellerbe Scholarship Application

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Page 1: Fiona Wholey

Fiona Wholey | 2015elle

rbe a

ppli

cat

ion

Page 2: Fiona Wholey
Page 3: Fiona Wholey

Architecture might not be able to change the fundamental human condition; it might not be able to solve everything however its role is to inspire us and speak to us of life and beauty. The difference between a building and architecture is that architecture can communicate these ideas – it can communicate values and beliefs whereas a building just meets our basic needs. Architecture can and should be read like a book even though for each person, it speaks a different truth.

The role of architecture, for me, is about discovery and to create a beautiful experience that responds to the scale of an individual. An architecture that is tactile, that allows people to interact with it. Incorporating the warmth of daylight, the feel of the air with operable windows or the blurring of boundaries and a diversity of sensory experiences.

Through that to create memories particularly as memory is so intimately connected with the physicality of space and the tactility of experience. That invites people to discover and it creates the space to envision other ways of being. Or simply, just to be a source of comfort when a beautiful space is most needed. To design spaces which provide a sense of permanence yet also the opportunity for people to write their own stories through them. As with most things, it is this simplicity that is the most complex to design for.

Within this framework of architecture, I am interested in using design to create a vision of possibilities and discovering new approaches to some of the challenges that we are facing from an aging population to a changing climate. Using architecture to re-think and expand to a systems view that examines the broader impact of the building on the surrounding environment and the way people live. Challenging assumptions on what a building could be and what we are expecting a building to do for us.

While I do not yet know the scale, the type, or even the style of architecture that I would like to design, I view architecture as a profession of continuing development and discovery. I would like to develop a deeper understanding of what it means to design a home, or a hospital, or an office and what those types of spaces mean. Ultimately, my career goal is a process of continual discovery through design.

Thomas F. EllErbEWritten application Statement

FEbruary 15, 2015

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Page 5: Fiona Wholey

0102030405

contact

[email protected] | 612.226.2303linkedin.com/in/FionaWholey | iSSue.com/FWholey univerSity oF minneSota | m.arch Gd iii

hEavy air | Day CEnTEr + Day CarEtianjin, china

maggiE’s CEnTErminneapoliS, mn

riparian WETlanD rEsEarCh + lEarning CEnTErminneapoliS, mn

ThE minnEsoTa aTlas | minEralsminneSota

rEsumE

co

nte

ntS

Page 6: Fiona Wholey

hEavy air | Day CEnTEr + Day CarEtianjin, china

proFeSSor: blaine broWnell

m.arCh Fall 201401

Located in Tianjin, China this project is about directly addressing existing air pollution and actively seeking to re-mediate the air. It is re-creating the experience to be outside and breath fresh air.

The building creates a protected unconditioned area acting as the streets and community spaces. With trees and grass throughout this space, it is creating a protected area to experience being outdoors while unexposed to the site’s poor air quality. The air is filtered by a carbon eating mesh of Titanium Dioxide Pigment and further refined passively with the incorporation of trees throughout the ‘streets’.

The programs, a day center for the elderly and day care, are housed within individual volumes that open out onto the interior streets. Two levels allow for an interplay between the programs and fluidity of interaction while each program still contains a center and is oriented around their own courtyard.

These program spaces are further conditioned with radiant heating systems and the further one goes into the building, the more protected they are from the external site conditions while always having views to reconnect to the site.

Site plan

Page 7: Fiona Wholey

DOWN to 3.9M

DOWN to 3.9 m

UP to 4.8 m

DOWN to 3.9 m

DOWN to 3.9M

UP to 4.8 m

DOWN toground

UP to 3.9M

UP to 6M

DOWN to ground

UP to 3.9M

1

Site plan

South eaSt elevation

Page 8: Fiona Wholey

Kitchen + Pantry

Office

Storage

Day Care | 1-2yrs

Day Care | .6 - 1yrs

Activity Center | Tables

Day Care | 3-4 yrs

Day Care Courtyard

Day Center Courtyard

Mechancial

Play Equipment

Exercise Equipment

Kitchen

Admin Offices

Storage

Meeting Rooms

Media

Lounge

VIP Areas

Reception

Model Unit 1 Bedroom

Exhibition

Crafts + Art | Day Centre

Activity Center | Tables

Staff Lounge

Sleep Area

Cafe + Tables

Play Area

Games + Play

Offices

Lounge

Meeting Room

Meeting Room

Second Floor

E D

C

Ground Floor

Page 9: Fiona Wholey

day care Section

day center Section

Page 10: Fiona Wholey

maggiE’s CEnTErminneapoliS, mnproFeSSor: mary GuzoWSki

m.arCh spring 201402

Roof Upper 10’

Roof Upper 12’

A Maggie’s Center is a place that provides for the non-medical needs of those with cancer offering practical, emotional and social support. This Maggie’s Center is located near to the Masonic Cancer Center at the University of Minnesota.

The building is about providing a variety of spaces that can respond to an individual’s changing needs as they go through the long-term process of treatment.

It provides areas for community support - a kitchen and hearth which are central and highly visible while at the same time, creating

spaces for contemplation and solitude when needed - all while in a busy urban environment.

Layers of enclosure, primarily using landscape, ensure that a level of privacy and quiet is available while creating an interaction between the street and the building.

The building utilizes daylight with views of smaller gardens to connect with the landscape and create a building that changes as the seasons change especially to utilize the high latitude of Minnesota and potential for dramatically different experiences in each season.

Page 11: Fiona Wholey

morninG 9am noon aFternoon 3pm

december 21St

march|September 21St

exquiSite room model photoS

Woodland

Native Grasses + Wildflowers

Prairie Dropseed | Short Grass

Site plan

june 21St

Page 12: Fiona Wholey

Summer Section b | landScape + ShadinG

Winter Section b| hearth + center

Summer perSpective

Page 13: Fiona Wholey

Summer Section b | landScape + ShadinG

Winter Section b| hearth + center

Winter perSpective

Page 14: Fiona Wholey

A

Se

ctio

n

A

B Section

B

A

El

evat

ion

A

B Elevation

B

C Elevation C

Research Lab

Research LabTeaching Lab

Parking

Delivery

Mechanical

Classroom

Classroom

Seminar

Seminar

Wet Classroom

Auditorium

Outdoor Classroom

Teaching Lab

Meeting Room

Workroom

Computer Room

Board Room

Open Offices

Open Offices

Exhibition Space

Lobby

Multimedia

Pre-Event

Auditorium

Outdoor Exhibition+ Green Roof

Storage

Office

Office

Office

Storage

ClassroomStorage

Storage

Maintanence

Maintanence

Archive Collections

Storage

Storage

Maintanence

Green Roof

riparian WETlanD rEsEarCh + lEarning CEnTErminneapoliS, mnproFeSSor: jeFFrey mandyck

m.arCh Fall 201303

loWer level

The area around Lowry Bridge is a space of division. Highway 94 severs people from the river allowing only limited access to this resource. The industrial uses and their forms contribute to this division through restricted access and limited connections separating residential areas west of Hwy 94 and east of the Mississippi.

The Riparian Wetland Research and Learning Center is about addressing these divisions between flows and program. It seeks to be an element that connects people with the river and also one that connects Minneapolis with the RiverFirst Wetlands.

The building form and program seek to include traces of this idea of division while it’s overarching vision is to bring disparate elements and flows together. This is reflected in the separation

of the program into two distinct experiences, each with their own structural system that responds to the scale of space that those programs require.

One is about research. Responding to the need for longer spans and larger loads, a steel frame is used that provides flexibility and strength necessary for the laboratory spaces. The placement of the windows present a visual connection to the interior activities while ensuring restricted access with only one primary point of entrance.

The other is about community outreach. This program is about relationships and creating more intimate and varied spaces. A concrete pan and joist system is used reflecting the smaller spaces required.

eaSt elevation

Page 15: Fiona Wholey

A

Se

ctio

n

A

B Section

B

A

El

evat

ion

A

B Elevation

B

C Elevation C

Research Lab

Research LabTeaching Lab

Parking

Delivery

Mechanical

Classroom

Classroom

Seminar

Seminar

Wet Classroom

Auditorium

Outdoor Classroom

Teaching Lab

Meeting Room

Workroom

Computer Room

Board Room

Open Offices

Open Offices

Exhibition Space

Lobby

Multimedia

Pre-Event

Auditorium

Outdoor Exhibition+ Green Roof

Storage

Office

Office

Office

Storage

ClassroomStorage

Storage

Maintanence

Maintanence

Archive Collections

Storage

Storage

Maintanence

Green Roof

Ground Floor Second Floor

Page 16: Fiona Wholey

816

Site plan

Page 17: Fiona Wholey

material axon

Page 18: Fiona Wholey

ThE minnEsoTa aTlas | minEralsminneSota

team memberS: anton + turGeon-Schramm

CaTalysT 201204

The Minnesota Atlas explored the natural resources of the state and, through mapping seemingly unrelated data, sought to discover new opportunities and processes.

This part of the project examined the minerals in the state. Peat and iron ore became the focus as they exist in opposite ends of the spectrum in terms of raw production and distance the materials travel.

These minerals were mapped in relation to their production, abundance, and transportation traveled to market. Through this it was possible to see that

iron ore is Minnesota’s largest mineral export however also travels a great distance and is declining in terms of it’s quality and amount. However, while peat is the second least exported mineral, it is abundant in the north of Minnesota, requires less processing, and has a far shorter travel to market.

Through examining these minerals with a new lens, alternative networks and forms of production began to suggest themselves.

Deposits

iron ore

peat

processing

iron ore

peat

transportation

Barge

Freight

truck

port LanD use

DeveLopeD

Page 19: Fiona Wholey

DuLuth/superior

harBors

taconite harBor

thunDer Bay

Marquette

escanaBa

chicago

inDiana harBor

gary

Burns harBor

Detroit

toLeDo

Lorain

cLeveLanD

ashtaBuLa

conneaut

port cargo voLuMe oF iron ore (in tonnes)

40,000,00020,000,00010,000,0005,000,0002,500,000

Minnesota raw MineraL proDuction

Clays, Sand, Lime, Gravel

Stone: DimensionStone: CrushedSand, Gravel, Construction

GemstonesPeat

Iron Ore

1830000

16700110000188000

72850

2015860

USGS Mineral Commodity Survey 2009(In thousand dollars)

Page 20: Fiona Wholey

Fiona [email protected] | 612.226.23035 augusta Lane, st. pauL, Minnesota, 55110LinkeDin.coM/in/FionawhoLey | issue.coM/FwhoLey

05

pErkins + Will, umn rEsEarCh ConsorTiumMSRP Research | Building Resilience: A Framework to Assess + Communicate Resilience

sChool oF publiC hEalTh, univErsiTy oF minnEsoTa: Web editorDevelopment and maintenance of wordpress sites.

habiTaT For humaniTy: House MontH Volunteer Working on a LEED certified house including framing, insulation, porch, and interior finishing

urban DEsign lonDon: Project officer Facilitated urban design training courses and events including visits to the Olympic Park 2012. Developed training material for a green space urban design program and on-line education courses.

soas, univErsiTy oF lonDon: GraPHic desiGner Designed monthly magazine for th

spaCE synTax lTD: intern Analysis and mapping of existing and proposed movement routes using GIS and SSx software. Projects: Gummersbach: Urban Baseline, I-VALUL: Mapping the social and economic costs of spatial layouts and SEDUC: Exploring crime and spatial layout

CobalT DEvElopmEnT sErviCEs WEbsiTE (hTTp://WWW.CobalT-lTD.Com/) alWays on a sunDay book CovEr appropriaTE inFrasTruCTurE DEvElopmEnT group: researcH Volunteer

inDiE-griEs + WaTEr basins: construction Volunteer

ConsErvaTion volunTEErs ausTralia: Volunteer

10/2014 - current MinneapoLis, Mn

12/2011 - 05/2014 MinneapoLis, Mn

09/2011 - 12/2011 MinneapoLis, Mn

04/2009 - 05/2010 LonDon, uk

08/2009 - 01/2010 LonDon, uk

10/2008 - 02/2009 LonDon, uk

09/2010 - 02/2011 LonDon, uk

05/2007- 07/2007 XeLa, guateMaLa

08/2004 - 09/2004 keraLa, inDia

08/2003 - 09/2003 cairns, austraLia

proFEssional ExpEriEnCE

aDDiTional ExpEriEnCE

DraFting

Rhino •••AutoCad •••Sketchup •••Revit ••

soFtware

Photoshop ••••Illustrator ••••Indesign ••••

other

Office ••••WordPress •••GIS •

Languages

English (native)Spanish ••

skill sET

Page 21: Fiona Wholey

M.arcH, Gdiii College of Design, University of Minnesota

[in]arcHitecture suMMer ProGraMCollege of Environmental Design: University of California Berkeley

Msc urban PlanninG, spECialism urban DEsign The Bartlett, University College London Dissertation: Perceptions of safety and the More London Development

Professional certificate in PHotoGraPHyBoston University and the Center for Digital Imaging Arts

ba socioloGy University of York Dissertation: Western conceptions of the city and how the transition from modern to post-modern society influenced them

AIA Minneapolis Fellowship KKE - Ron Krank Vision Award Sandy Ritter Fellowship Bruce Abrahamson Graduate Fellowship

JEFFrEy manDyCk [email protected] Adjunct ProfessorUniversity of Minnesota GD2 Studio Professor

naT maDson [email protected] Adjunct Professor University of Minnesota GD1 Studio Professor

mark EngEbrETson [email protected] Communications Manager University of Minnesota School of Public Health Manager 12/11 - 09/12

rEFErEnCEs

09/2012 - current MinneapoLis, Mn

06/2011 - 08/2011 BerkeLey, ca

2007 - 2008 LonDon, uk

2006 - 2006 Boston, Ma

2002 - 2005 york, uk

EDuCaTion

FElloWships