stregthening campus, community & migrant education program collaborations

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STREGTHENING CAMPUS, COMMUNITY & MIGRANT EDUCATION PROGRAM COLLABORATIONS By: Ms. Ofelia Gamez, CAMP Director <[email protected]) California State University, Fresno Ms. Vivian Barrera, CAMP Director <[email protected]> California State University, Long Beach Dr. Steve Duncan, HEP Director <[email protected]> Wake Tech Community College Guest: Rosa E. Coronado, Migrant

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STREGTHENING CAMPUS, COMMUNITY & MIGRANT EDUCATION PROGRAM COLLABORATIONS. By: Ms. Ofelia Gamez, CAMP Director

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Slide 1COLLABORATIONS
By:
California State University, Fresno
California State University, Long Beach
Dr. Steve Duncan, HEP Director <[email protected]>
Wake Tech Community College
Guest: Rosa E. Coronado, Migrant Education Program Region XVI, Monterey County Office of Education, Director II
CAMP
CAMPUS &
MIGRANT EDUCATION PROGRAM (MEP) COLLABORATIONS
Find ways to fulfill your program goals and objectives through creating new activities.
Examples of
CAMPUS COLLABORATIONS
CAMP Classes
Backfill provided for each University 1 class (freshmen experience class) taught (3 classes fall semester x $2,500 per class = $7,500)
Computer Training for CAMP Students
Professor offers Saturday training workshops for all CAMP students
Facilities and Housing
STRENGTHEN MEP
Evaluate your recruitment plan
How can you meet your recruitment goals with MEP collaboration?
Learn MEP Strategic Plan
Discuss possible activities
Migrant Education Program (MEP)
by Rosa E. Coronado, Migrant Education Program Region XVI, Monterey County Office of Education, Director II
Migrant Education Purpose & Program Goals
Regional Application and District Service Agreements
Stakeholders
MEP NEEDS
by Rosa E. Coronado, Migrant Education Program Region XVI, Monterey County Office of Education, Director II
Student Guidance
Out-of-School Youth
Other Needs
MEP NEEDS
by Rosa E. Coronado, Migrant Education Program Region XVI, Monterey County Office of Education, Director II
Providing supplemental services and outreach to students and parents
Fulfilling MEP application and service agreement requirements
Assistance with identification and recruitment of migrant students
Advocacy, advocacy, advocacy!
Participate in Identification & Recruitment
Coordinate workshops, conferences, retreats, summer programs to help meet MEP goals
CAMP &
Migrant Youth Day
Migrant Senior Day
Parent Advocacy Conference
Summer Programs (ie., ELD, Math, CAHSEE, Science, OSY)
- There is a charge per participant to host events; any residual funds remaining are utilized for approved expenses and scholarships
CSU, LONG BEACH
by Vivian Barrera, CAMP Director
Examples of collaborations on campus
- MEP Programs in CA bring their students and their parents for campus tours. CAMP provides student panels to visitors and conducts tours on campus.
- Example of MEP collaboration
-
Collaborative Model
The goal of the MEP at the Los Angeles County Office of Education (LACOE) is to provide supplementary, enrichment, and education based experiences for migrant student’s preschool-age through 12th grade.
To support these efforts, CAMP at CSU, Long Beach will enter into a collaborative teaching and mentoring project for student academic support.
The implementation of the project will involve 3 migrant college interns who will assist project coordinators with instruction, one-on-one tutorial, supervision and mentoring of students.
CSULB & Los Angeles MEP
SCIENCE ACADEMY:
The Science Academy offers migrant students in grades 1st-6th the opportunity to experience hands-on math and science learning activities. The goal of the program is to develop positive attitudes about science and promote an active curiosity in natural phenomena, technical achievements as well as an interest in careers in the field of Science.
Academic Enrichment Projects
MIGRANT EDUCATION EVEN START (MEES)/FIRST 5:
The MEES/First 5 Program is designed to help improve the literacy skills of participating migrant preschool-age children and their parents by integrating early childhood education and parenting education into a unified family literacy program. Through literacy activities parents are better able to involve themselves in the education of their children and provide the necessary support and encouragement that their preschool-age children need to prepare for school.
Academic Enrichment Projects
continued
CLOSE-UP:
Close-Up is a civics education program that provides middle and high school students with experiential learning about democracy and government in action. The instruction encourages students to become well-informed active citizens and increases their knowledge on how individuals can make a difference in their community through service. There are 3 components to the program, all of which require journal writing of the following experiences: (1) Instruction in civics education, (2) Weeklong visit to Washington, D.C., and (3) Forty hours of community service work.
Academic Enrichment Projects
COLLEGE ACCESS PROGRAM
College Access Program (CAP) provides supplemental support to migrant students in grades 6th-12th to prepare them to be eligible for admissions to any of the four college strands upon high school graduation. Students and their parents visit local colleges and universities and participate in planning workshops for postsecondary education.
Wake Tech HEP Advisory Board
Members and Partners
Collaboration Assurance Requirement
“The grantee will develop and implement a plan for identifying and using the resources of the participating IHE and the community to supplement and enhance the services provided by the project”
Source: Edgar Section 34CFR, 206.20 (d) (2)
WAKE TECH
COMMUNITY COLLEGE
Finding 1:
Finding: 
The grantee’s application included an objective to use an on-campus advisory group to increase the university’s capacity to serve CAMP students.  Further, the IHE commitment to retain first-generation college students through their full undergraduate program is well understood and supported by CAMP and related programs.  Nonetheless, with the exception of local and State MEP programs, the reviewers found few partnerships outside the campus that worked directly with the CAMP students.  Given the commitment the university has demonstrated to supporting the retention of its CAMP students beyond the freshman year, the reviewers also believe that not including community organizations and leaders as members of the advisory network is a critical oversight.
WAKE TECH
COMMUNITY COLLEGE
Identify an organization with whom you wish to partner
Make contact with the organization and identify a member who truly believes in your program’s mission
Utilize your Advisory Board members to maximize the program’s effectiveness
Ensure your Board members feel their contributions are valued and appreciated
WAKE TECH
COMMUNITY COLLEGE
Networking Vs Collaboration
A HEP/CAMP grant chooses to work with a community organization by sharing relevant information about its program.
Participating at MEP regional meetings
Obtaining COEs from state MEP Recruiter
Attending NC Hispanic Educational Summit to network with agencies
Mexican Consulate invites HEP to “Jornada Sabatina”
Wake Tech Director of Counseling services serves on HEP Advisory Board
A HEP/CAMP grant collaborates with a community organization by sharing resources.
East Coast Migrant Head Start Project adjusts its calendar to offer classroom space to the Wake Tech HEP program
BB&T creates GED category in Writing Contest to include HEP students
Mexican Consulate assists in setting up a booth at their facility
Wake Tech provides mail service and no cost to the HEP grant
Networking
Collaboration
Networking is simply sharing information for the benefit of both parties.
Collaboration includes a willingness to alter activities to achieve a
common purpose.
WAKE TECH
COMMUNITY COLLEGE
Accelerate effectiveness
Increase profitability
Reduce costs
“Partnerships built on these principles have a much greater likelihood of succeeding. In an effective partnership, 2 + 2 should equal 5, not 3.”
Guy Kawasaki (2004)
“The Art of Partnering” in The Art of the Start
WAKE TECH
COMMUNITY COLLEGE