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Engaging Digital Natives with Web 2.0Jennifer Carrier Dormanhttp://jdorman.wikispaces.com/PETEC2008

The Case for Digital LearningEducation is changing.Competition is changing internationally.The workplace, jobs, and skill demands are changing.

The ImplicationsThese changes, among others, are ushering us toward a world where knowledge, power, and productive capability will be more dispersed than at any time in our historya world where value creation will be fast, fluid, and persistently disruptive. Wikinomics: How Mass Collaboration Changes EverythingDon Tapscott & Anthony D. Williams

Digital Natives

Digital NativesOur students today are all native speakers of the digital language of computers, video games, instantaneous communication, and the Internet.Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants Marc Prensky

The ChallengeOur Digital Immigrant instructors, who speak an outdated language (that of the pre-digital age), are struggling to teach a population that speaks an entirely new language

Learning Profile of Digital NativesDigital Natives are used to receiving information really fast. They like to parallel process and multi-task. They prefer their graphics before their text rather than the opposite. Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants Marc Prensky

Learning Profile of Digital NativesThey prefer random access (like hypertext). They function best when networked. They thrive on instant gratification and frequent rewards. They prefer games to serious work. Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants Marc Prensky

Web 2.0

Web 1.0 Web 2.0

What is Web 2.0?"It's made of people. It's not content." Jeff Jarvis, Buzzmachine"The interconnected web." Andrew Anker, Six Apart"Web 2.0 is the two-way web where content finds you."Ron Rasmussen, KnowNow"People doing things together on the web."Mitchell Baker, Mozilla Foundation"Web 2.0 is about platforms that other people can build on."Rajat Paharia, Bunchball

What does Web 2.0 look like?Web as a platformLight-weight web applications; explosion in creativityUser-generated contentIncreased accessibility; numerous media formatsSharing and re-mixingCulture; creating by assembly and interpretationEconomic and educational value

Participatory Culture

Powerful Learning EnvironmentsPowerful learning environments are usually defined as being environments that seek to develop complex and higher order cognitive skills, deep conceptual understanding and metacognitive skills such as the ability to self-regulate ones own learning de Corte 1990

Participatory CultureAccording to a recent study from the Pew Internet & American Life project (Lenhardt & Madden, 2005), more than one-half of all teens have created media content, and roughly one-third of teens who use the Internet have shared content they produced.Confronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture: Media Education for the 21st CenturyHenry Jenkins

Forms of Participatory CultureAffiliations memberships, formal and informal, in online communities centered around various forms of mediaExpressions producing new creative forms, such as digital sampling, skinning and modding, fan videomaking, fan fiction writing, zines, mash-upsConfronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture: Media Education for the 21st CenturyHenry Jenkins

Forms of Participatory CultureCollaborative Problem-solving working together in teams, formal and informal, to complete tasks and develop new knowledge Circulations Shaping the flow of mediaConfronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture: Media Education for the 21st CenturyHenry Jenkins

BenefitsA growing body of scholarship suggests potential benefits of these forms of participatory culture, including:opportunities for peer-to-peer learning, a changed attitude toward intellectual property, the diversification of cultural expression, the development of skills valued in the modern workplace, and a more empowered conception of citizenship. Confronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture: Media Education for the 21st CenturyHenry Jenkins

Impact on LearningParticipatory culture shifts the focus of literacy from one of individual expression to community involvement.The new literacies almost all involve social skills developed through collaboration and networking.These skills build on the foundation of traditional literacy, research skills, technical skills, and critical analysis skills taught in the classroom.Confronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture: Media Education for the 21st CenturyHenry Jenkins

21st Century Literacies

21st Century LiteraciesPlay the capacity to experiment with ones surroundings as a form of problem-solvingPerformance the ability to adopt alternative identities for the purpose of improvisation and discoverySimulation the ability to interpret and construct dynamic models of real-world processesConfronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture: Media Education for the 21st CenturyHenry Jenkins

21st Century LiteraciesAppropriation the ability to meaningfully sample and remix media contentMultitasking the ability to scan ones environment and shift focus as needed to salient details.Distributed Cognition the ability to interact meaningfully with tools that expand mental capacitiesConfronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture: Media Education for the 21st CenturyHenry Jenkins

21st Century LiteraciesCollective Intelligence the ability to pool knowledge and compare notes with others toward a common goalJudgment the ability to evaluate the reliability and credibility of different information sourcesConfronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture: Media Education for the 21st CenturyHenry Jenkins

21st Century LiteraciesTransmedia Navigation the ability to follow the flow of stories and information across multiple modalitiesNetworking the ability to search for, synthesize, and disseminate informationConfronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture: Media Education for the 21st CenturyHenry Jenkins

21st Century LiteraciesNegotiation the ability to travel across diverse communities, discerning and respecting multiple perspectives, and grasping and following alternative normsConfronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture: Media Education for the 21st CenturyHenry Jenkins

Learning 2.0

Learning 2.0?Is it possible to draw on the activities emerging through social software to create learning communities which offer young people personalized, collaborative learning experiences such as those that are already emerging in the world outside the school gates?www.futurelab.org.uk/research/opening_education.htm

Social Software and LearningSome of the key attributes of social software in relation to education are that it: Delivers communication between groups. Enables communication between many people. Provides gathering and sharing resources.Delivers collaborative collecting and indexing of information. Allows syndication and assists personalization of priorities. Has new tools for knowledge aggregation and creation of new knowledge. Delivers to many platforms as is appropriate to the creator, recipient and context. www.futurelab.org.uk/research/opening_education.htm

Delivers communication between groupsThere are implicit mechanisms that allow interest groups to electronically coalesce to be aware of what each other are doing and to review each others actions and to allow those actions to benefit each other member of a community. www.futurelab.org.uk/research/opening_education.htm

Enables communication between many peopleIf the authors wish, all their work is available to the rest of the digital world. Access is available to expert and novice alike and, in fact, social software provides systems whereby experts and novices can work together.www.futurelab.org.uk/research/opening_education.htm

Provides gathering and sharing resourcesIt provides a means of gathering and making material available. Simple acts like putting holiday snapshots on a searchable photo site can give others insight into the location, for instance; for other people making available their work in progress can both inform others and prompt critical feedback. www.futurelab.org.uk/research/opening_education.htm

Delivers collaborative collecting and indexing of informationNo longer is knowledge limited by historically constructed visions of curricula. There are new ways of organizing and finding knowledge objects that are of interest to you and the groups with whom you share interests. www.futurelab.org.uk/research/opening_education.htm

Allows syndication and assists personalization of priorities There are mechanisms to be passively active. You can choose what information streams you want to be kept informed about and that information will come to you rather than you having to go and seek it. It will help you both keep abreast with your co-workers online activity and those other information streams you actually prioritize.www.futurelab.org.uk/research/opening_education.htm

Has new tools for knowledge aggregation and creation of new knowledge The massive uptake of MP3 music players is indicative of a move to collecting material from many sources and aggregating it for our personal use. There are also tools that allow that content to be modified and incorporated in new formulations: the concept of a mash-up.www.futurelab.org.uk/research/opening_education.htm

Delivers to many platforms as is appropriate to the creator, recipient and context Creators and users of social software tools and content know their lives are not constrained to desktops, they use many media: mobile phones; PDAs; MP3 players and games consoles. They increasingly expect that the digital part of their life will integrate with them in the