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  • Slide 1
  • Sustainable Horticulture!! Carl Motsenbocker Co-State Louisiana SARE Director School of Plant, Environmental and Soil Sciences www.lasare.agcenter.lsu.edu
  • Slide 2
  • The primary goals of sustainable agriculture include: Providing a more profitable farm income.
  • Slide 3
  • Promoting environmental stewardship, including: Protecting and improving soil quality Reducing dependence on non- renewable resources, such as fuel and synthetic fertilizers and pesticides, and Minimizing adverse impacts on safety, wildlife, water quality and other environmental resources
  • Slide 4
  • Promoting stable, prosperous farm families and communities (SARE, sare.org)
  • Slide 5
  • Sustainable Production Farm profitability Environmental stewardship Quality of life for farm families and rural communities
  • Slide 6
  • Sustainable Goals Sustain economic viability Sustain environmental stewardship Sustain social responsibility and quality of life
  • Slide 7
  • Sustainable is Not Always Organic But it is innovative
  • Slide 8
  • What is Sustainable Agriculture? Answer: Sustainable includes many types of agriculture
  • Slide 9
  • When is Agriculture Sustainable? Maintains a diverse ecosystem Reduces environmental impacts Minimizes pest problems It has to be profitable
  • Slide 10
  • Sustainability is... A goal A direction A guiding principle
  • Slide 11
  • Is Sustainability a Philosophy or a Set of Practices? Sustainability has to be adaptable and supportive of community environments
  • Slide 12
  • Sustainability is Profitable Includes production and processing Business concepts and marketing
  • Slide 13
  • Sustainable is Environmental Management Soil management Crop management Livestock management Water management Integrated Pest Management (IPM)
  • Slide 14
  • Dont Forget Marketing Most sustainable operations fail not from poor production practices but from lack of marketing
  • Slide 15
  • USDA S.A.R.E. & the Louisiana Program SARE = Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education SARE PDP = Professional Development Program Mutual goal of both programs is to teach technical skills and to provide information Focus on agriculture professionals
  • Slide 16
  • Louisiana SARE Dr. Owusu Bandele, Southern University Agricultural Center Dr. Carl Motsenbocker, LSU AgCenter Model State Program Ms. Emily Neustrom, State Program Assistant La SARE Board http://www.lasare.agcenter.lsu.edu
  • Slide 17
  • Community Food Program Components nutrition education market gardening community gardening youth gardening school gardening community supported agriculture (CSA) micro-enterprise development gleaning consumer education and marketing buying clubs business training community kitchens farm to school programs farmers markets. food policy councils
  • Slide 18
  • In the United States, approximately 80 % of the population and almost 73 % of Louisiana residents, live in metropolitan areas (US Census Bureau, 2007). The complexity of the food production and transport system has increased as food production has shifted to centralized production areas with food typically traveling from 1500 to 2500 miles from farm to consumers table (Halwell, 2002).
  • Slide 19
  • Food insecurity: is where people skip meals or eat too little and they tend to have lower quality diets or rely on emergency food because they are unable to afford necessary food for their families. US poverty rate was 12.6 percent in 2005 with 37 million people, including 13 million children living in households at risk for hunger or that experience hunger (US Census Bureau, 2007). The poverty rate for Louisianans was 17.1 % in 2005 with almost 25 % of children in Louisiana living in poverty. Many Louisianans and Americans do not get enough to eat on a daily basis and often depend on emergency food sources.
  • Slide 20
  • Food Access In many low-income areas, full-service grocery stores are not available. Example, in Old South Baton Rouge (OSBR), Louisiana there are no full-scale grocery stores and availability of fresh fruits and vegetables is limited. Residents must travel out of the neighborhood to larger grocery stores as the local markets generally have few fresh produce available. Public transport available? The elderly poor, with little disposable income and fragile health issues often find it difficult to travel out of the neighborhood for grocery items.
  • Slide 21
  • Urban Agriculture Local Food Systems Why buy local food? It is fresher, tastier and more nutritious. It supports local farmers and keeps more of your food dollar working in your hometown. It conserves energy and reduces output of greenhouse gases. It gives you a better picture of how your food is produced. Community Food Programs
  • Slide 22
  • School Gardening Can we interest students in science through gardening and garden-based activities? Can we impact childrens attitudes towards preference for fruits and vegetables?
  • Slide 23
  • Community Gardening
  • Slide 24
  • Youth Gardening
  • Slide 25
  • Market Gardening
  • Slide 26
  • Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) Partnership between local community members and local growers that work together to create and maintain an economically stable food system, encourage land stewardship, and promote community development.
  • Slide 27
  • Farmers Markets Union Square, NYC
  • Slide 28
  • Nationally the estimated number of farmers markets has increased almost 250 percent from 1994 to 2006 Over 3700 farmers markets currently operating in the US (USDA-AMS, 2007).
  • Slide 29
  • Assist development of recipes and food production. Preparing, cooking, filling, labeling, flash- freezing and cooling food for sale. Community Kitchens Ex: Jubilee Project Inc., East Tennessee (http://www.jubileeproject.holston.org/)
  • Slide 30
  • Garden sessions Garden based nutrition education Garden tastings Farm field trips Local food in school lunches Farm to School Programs Alice Waters, Edible Schoolyard www.edibleschoolyard.orgwww.edibleschoolyard.org http://www.esynola.org/
  • Slide 31
  • Community Food Program Components nutrition education market gardening community gardening youth gardening school gardening community supported agriculture (CSA) micro-enterprise development gleaning consumer education and marketing buying clubs business training community kitchens farm to school programs farmers markets.
  • Slide 32
  • Salinas, CA to Baton Rouge, LA 2100 miles Charles and Jaynell Glaser, New Roads, LA 36 miles to Red Stick Farmers Market Food Miles: Lettuce
  • Slide 33
  • Community Food Shed Urban Agriculture