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Page 1: Publicity 101

©Copyright Laurie Boettcher 2009

Publicity101

presented by Laurie Boettcher

Page 2: Publicity 101

©Copyright Laurie Boettcher 2009

Publicity 101

Before worrying about publicity, let’s worry about who we are.

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©Copyright Laurie Boettcher 2009

Publicity 101

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©Copyright Laurie Boettcher 2009

Publicity 101

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©Copyright Laurie Boettcher 2009

Publicity 101

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©Copyright Laurie Boettcher 2009

Publicity 101

This is what we do to our patrons.

When we don’t use a clean, consistent image,

we confuse them about who we are,what we represent,

our impact on the community,but most of all,

we destroy our credibility.

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©Copyright Laurie Boettcher 2009

Publicity 101

Our logo should be a reflection of our library’s character and

personality.

But, more important than the actual logo is that we

USE IT.

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©Copyright Laurie Boettcher 2009

Publicity 101

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Publicity 101

We need to use our logo on

EVERYTHING.

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Publicity 101

• Letterhead• Envelopes• Fax Cover Sheets• Business Cards• Brochures• Library Cards• Bookmarks• Magnets

• Event Posters • News Releases• Postcards• Ads• Handouts• Apparel• Buttons• EVERYTHING

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Publicity 101

A clean consistent image tells our patrons we know who we are and we aren’t going anywhere.

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Publicity 101

If there is one thing you take

from this workshop

today, I hope it is that

you realize the absolute

necessityof logo usage.

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©Copyright Laurie Boettcher 2009

Publicity 101

Once we know who we are, we can focus on publicity.

What is publicity to you?

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©Copyright Laurie Boettcher 2009

Publicity 101

Publicity is . . .

. . . making something known to the public, spreading information to your market.

It is information with a ‘news value’ used to attract public attention or support.

Publicity is a form of promotion, but differs from advertising because

it is free.

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©Copyright Laurie Boettcher 2009

Publicity 101

Free publicity is available to us.

And we don't need

any particular background or training

to do it.

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Publicity 101

What we do need is the belief in ourselves

and our libraries.

And, we need the diligence and perseveranceto continue when one idea

doesn't pan out.

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Publicity 101

Bad ideas happen to everyone.

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©Copyright Laurie Boettcher 2009

Publicity 101

The foundation ofgood publicity is personality.

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Publicity 101

Define the Message

What do we want to tell?

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©Copyright Laurie Boettcher 2009

Publicity 101

Define the Message

What do we want to tell?

Are we all on the same page?

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©Copyright Laurie Boettcher 2009

Publicity 101

Define the Message

What do we want to tell?

Are we all on the same page?

To whom should we be telling?

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©Copyright Laurie Boettcher 2009

Publicity 101

Define the Message

What do we want to tell?

Are we all on the same page?

To whom should we be telling?

Anyone who will listen!

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Publicity 101

Don’t Tell Yet

Before we publicize,let’s figure out what kind of

community support we can get.

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Publicity 101

Solidifying the involvementof local talent or celebrities

is important to know BEFOREwe publicize our event

as it could attractmore attention.

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©Copyright Laurie Boettcher 2009

Publicity 101

Use Our Logo!

Now is the time to create the promotional pieces that include

our logo.

What pieces make sensefor this event?

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Publicity 101

• Posters• Invitations• Bookmarks• Book Covers• Balloons• Garden Seeds• Tickets• Banners

• Prizes • Giveaways• News Releases• Ads• Handouts• Apparel• Buttons

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©Copyright Laurie Boettcher 2009

Publicity 101

Deliver the Message

Give your local media the inside scoop.

Local media is more likely to pick up and publicize our story if

we give it to them first.

They don’t want to be old news.

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©Copyright Laurie Boettcher 2009

Publicity 101

Make a personable media pitch.

• Give a compliment about a recent story

• Offer a private tour, set up private meeting, etc.

• Always send a thank you

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©Copyright Laurie Boettcher 2009

Publicity 101

Social Media

Word of mouth (social media) is, BY FAR, the best form of publicity.

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Publicity 101

Social Media

Word of mouth (social media) is, BY FAR, the best form of publicity.

Why?

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Publicity 101

Social Media

Word of mouth (social media) is, BY FAR, the best form of publicity.

Why?

How can we use word-of-mouth publicity?

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Publicity 101

Next, ask book clubs, Friends, and other groups that gather at our

library if we can have a minute or two at the beginning of their gathering.

Use those few minutes to be a cheerleader for our library – thank everyone for coming and give a plug for a new or upcoming program.

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©Copyright Laurie Boettcher 2009

Publicity 101

Social media also includestapping into new technology.

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Publicity 101

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Publicity 101

Let’s take a closer look:PublishSocial news web sites made for people to discover and share content from anywhere on the Internet, by submitting links and stories, and commenting on submitted links and stories. This includes Wikis, which are internet-based software that allow users to freely edit and add information. Wikipedia is one of the most popular, however wikis are often used by companies internally. ALA uses Wikis for promotions like Teen Tech Week.

Share Web sites or software that allows users to publish or transfer digital photos, video, or art online, thus enabling the user to share them with others.

DiscussWeb applications that allow instant messaging, voice over internet protocol (VOIP), open source message boards, and phone calls over the internet.

Social networksWeb sites built with the intention of encouraging online socialization, these range from general friend networks (Facebook, MySpace) to particular niche audiences (Dogster and Catster).

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©Copyright Laurie Boettcher 2009

Micro-blogA web service allowing users to broadcast messages in short bursts, often limiting between 140-200 characters. Twitter is a highly popular micro-blogging platform.

LifestreamConsolidates the updates from social media and social networking web sites, social bookmarking web sites, blogs, and micro-blogging updates, as well as any other type of RSS/ Atom feed. Users can use this stream of information to create customized feeds to share with friends.

LivecastingSimilar to podcasting, except you can do a show live with audio only or full video. Listeners of the live show can chat with each other and the host. The show can then be embedded on a blog to create an archive.

Virtual worldsComputer-based simulated environment intended for its users to inhabit and interact via avatars.

Publicity 101

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©Copyright Laurie Boettcher 2009

Social GamesOffers games and a social gaming platform that leverages people’s social connections.

MMOA massively multiplayer online game (MMOG or MMO) is a video game which is capable of supporting hundreds or thousands of players simultaneously. By necessity, they are played on the Internet, and feature at least one persistent world. They are, however, not necessarily games played on personal computers. Most of the newer game consoles, including the Xbox 360, PlayStation Portable, PlayStation 3, Nintendo DS, and Wii can access the Internet and may therefore run MMO games.

MMOs can enable players to cooperate and compete with each other on a large scale, and sometimes to interact meaningfully with people around the world. They include a variety of gameplay types, representing many video game genres.

Publicity 101

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Publicity 101

This can be intimidating,but does not have to be.

Recruit teens, tweens, and young adults at our library to help.

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©Copyright Laurie Boettcher 2009

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Publicity 101

Join a local service club, such as Rotary,

Lions, or Kiwanis.Get involved with

Chamber andbusiness groups.

This is where our community leaders

are.

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Publicity 101

If time and resources to join a club don’t exist, still take every

opportunity and offer to present.• Stories have power • Tailor message to audience• Give the information they want• Be personable• Send an exciting,

positive message• Handouts

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Publicity 101

To be effective, we must alwaysspeak with credibility and

connection to our community.

If we must, we address our library’s issues in ways that transcend

partisan politics.

Do NOT go negative.

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BONUS!In the midst of all of this publicity,

we are making ourselves acredible resource.

Use it!

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Publicity 101

That was a very briefoverview of a few basic publicity

tactics we can use at our libraries.

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Publicity 101

Before we test our knowledgeand know-how, are there any

questions, comments, or thoughtsanyone would like to share?

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Publicity 101

Group Publicity Exercise

Famous Wisconsin authorMary Logue

is coming to our library onSaturday, June 6, 2009

to discuss her bookBone Harvest

and do a book signing.

How do we publicize this event?

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Publicity 101

Have we used:

• Our Logo

•Media

• Social Media

• Technology

• Civic Groups

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©Copyright Laurie Boettcher 2009

Publicity 101

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Publicity 101

Thank you for coming!

To ensure this workshop is a success at its other two sessions, your

feedback is GREATLY appreciated it.

Please leave your completedevaluations with Leah.

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©Copyright Laurie Boettcher 2009

Publicity 101

Laurie BoettcherSpeaker, Trainer, and

Social Media [email protected]