what is poetry?

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What is poetry?. Poetry is…. One of the three major types of literature (the others being prose and drama) “Literature that makes use of highly concise, musical, and emotionally charged language.” May “make use of imagery, figurative language, and special devices of sound such as rhyme.” - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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  • What is poetry?

  • From Prentice Hall Literature: Timeless Voices, Timeless ThemesPoetry isOne of the three major types of literature (the others being prose and drama)Literature that makes use of highly concise, musical, and emotionally charged language.May make use of imagery, figurative language, and special devices of sound such as rhyme.Often divided up into lines and stanzas with regular rhythms or meters.

    From Prentice Hall Literature: Timeless Voices, Timeless Themes

  • But really, what is poetry? Poetry is a picture, painted with words. The poet is an artist and language is his color palette. At first glance, the picture may appear to be random brushstrokes, but when the eye looks more deeply, it sees the whole picture as it was meant to be seen.

  • Figure of speechword or phrase that makes a comparison between seemingly unlike things. He collapsed onto the grass like a half-empty flour sack.from The Scarlet Ibis by James HurstYoull come across figures of speechor figurative languagein poetry, in prose, and in everyday speaking and writing. Figures of Speech

  • Figures of speechare not literally truemake imaginative connectionsexpress meaning in fresh and original waysoften act as a kind of shorthandFigures of Speech

  • Some figures of speech have become part of our everyday language. We dont even think about the fact that they arent literally true.He didnt notice how quickly the time flew by.My heart leapt at the thought.She must have gotten tied up in traffic.His room is a pigsty.Figures of Speech[End of Section]

  • Similecomparison between two unlike things, using a word such as like, as, than, or resembles.The dew on the leaves glistened as brilliantly as loose diamonds on silk.That childs eyes are warmer than the summers sandy beach.A lone oak tree stood in the front yard like an aged but dedicated sentry. Simile

  • Identify the two similes in this excerpt.What meaning is expressed by each simile?SimileQuick CheckMy mother has the prettiest tricks Of words and words and words. Her talk comes out as smooth and sleek As breasts of singing birds.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . We had not dreamed these things were so Of sorrow and of mirth.Her speech is as a thousand eyes Through which we see the earth.from Songs for my Mother by Anna Hempstead Branch[End of Section]

  • My mother has the prettiest tricks Of words and words and words. Her talk comes out as smooth and sleek As breasts of singing birds.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . We had not dreamed these things were so Of sorrow and of mirth.Her speech is as a thousand eyes Through which we see the earth.from Songs for my Mother by Anna Hempstead BranchSimileQuick CheckIdentify the two similes in this excerpt.

  • She has a beautiful, soothing voice.The mothers words influence the childrens perceptions of the world.SimileMy mother has the prettiest tricks Of words and words and words. Her talk comes out as smooth and sleek As breasts of singing birds.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . We had not dreamed these things were so Of sorrow and of mirth.Her speech is as a thousand eyes Through which we see the earth.from Songs for my Mother by Anna Hempstead BranchQuick CheckWhat meaning is expressed by each simile?

  • Metaphorcomparison between two unlike things in which one thing becomes the otherThe flood waters rose, and the river became a ravenous monster. Raging on for hours, it consumed everything in its sight.does not use a word such as like or asMetaphor

  • Poets use metaphors to make the reader think about new ways of seeing things.My heart it was a floating bird That through the world did wander free, But he hath locked it in a cage, And lost the silver key.from The Prince by Josephine Dodge DaskamWhat is the poet trying to say with this metaphor?Metaphor

  • A direct metaphor directly compares two things using a verb such as is.His ideas were a flock of birds in flight.[End of Section]An indirect metaphor implies or suggests the comparison.His ideas spread their wings and soared freely.Metaphor

  • Identify each metaphor as either direct or indirect. Metaphor[End of Section]Quick CheckThis computer is a dinosaur.She stared at me with venomous eyes and hissed out her reply.The old motorcycle barked and yipped before it started up with a howl. Today my mind is the wind blowing across rolling hills.

  • MetaphorQuick CheckIdentify each metaphor as either direct or indirect. This computer is a dinosaur.She stared at me with venomous eyes and hissed out her reply.The old motorcycle barked and yipped before it started up with a howl. Today my mind is the wind blowing across rolling hills.Direct Direct Indirect Indirect

  • Personificationspecial kind of metaphor in which human qualities are given to something that is not humanan animal, an object, or an idea.The sun was shining on the sea, Shining with all his might:He did his very best to make The billows smooth and bright.from The Walrus and the Carpenter by Lewis Carroll[End of Section]Personification

  • Review[End of Section]Quick CheckSpring caresses the earth and sky with her warm, delicate hands. Identify each figure of speech.SimileMetaphorPersonificationOur friendship is as comfortable as a pair of flannel pajamas.The old factory had become a heaving, grunting beast.

  • ReviewQuick CheckSpring caresses the earth and sky with her warm, delicate hands. Identify each figure of speech.SimileMetaphorPersonificationPersonificationOur friendship is as comfortable as a pair of flannel pajamas.The old factory had become a heaving, grunting beast.Simile Metaphor

  • Figures of speech are widely used. Look through a newspaper or magazine, including the advertisements, and gather at least six figures of speech. Look for examples of similes, metaphors, and personification.Practice[End of Section]

  • Page 352 of your textbookJabberwocky by Lewis CarrollTwas brillig and the slithy tovesdid gyre and gimble in the wabe;All mimsy were the borogoves,And the mome raths outgrabe.

    Beware the Jabberwock, my son!The jaws that bite, the claws that catch!Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun The frumious Bandersnatch!

    He took his vorpal sword in hand:Long time the manxome foe he soughtSo rested he by the Tumtum tree, And stood awhile in thought. And as in uffish thought he stood,The Jabberwock, with eyes of flame, Came whiffling through the tulgey wood, And burbled as it came!

    One, two! One, two! And through and throughThe vorpal blade went snicker-snack!He left it dead, and with its headHe went galumphing back.

    And has thou slain the Jabberwock?Come to my arms, my beamish boy!O frabjous day! Callooh! Callay!He chortled in his joy.Twas brillig and the slithy tovesdid gyre and gimble in the wabe;All mimsy were the borogoves,And the mome raths outgrabe.

    Page 352 of your textbook

  • Literary Term InterludeWhat is a stanza? (Hint: Refer to handout)

    How many stanzas make up Jabberwocky?

  • Discussion QuestionsCan you tell what the general idea of the poem is?What clues do you get from the poem as to the meaning?Even though many of these words are not familiar to you, why can you still get a general idea? Hint: Think structure.

  • Important Fact:This poem uses portmanteau words.A portmanteau word is an invented word; some are formed by blending two words into one.What two words form chortled?O frabjous day!What two words might be blended to form the word frabjous?

  • Grammar Mini-LessonYou can determine parts of speech for many of these portmanteau words by looking at their function and position in the sentence.Twas brillig, and the slithy toves Did gyre and gimble in the wabe;

    Parts of speech:Slithy:Toves:Gyre:Gimble:Wabe:

  • Grammar ContinuedTwas brillig, and the slithy toves Did gyre and gimble in the wabe;

    Parts of speech:Slithy: Adjective (modifies toves)Toves: Noun (probably an animal)Gyre: Verb (action done by the toves)Gimble: Verb (action done by the toves)Wabe: Noun (probably a place)

  • FUN ACTIVITYGet together in a group of threeChoose one person to highlight, one to write, and one to read. Highlight the made up words.Rewrite the poem on notebook paper using real words in place of the portmanteau words.Try to make the poem make sense.Read your version aloud to the class.

  • Now that you know a bit moreDid everyone have similar translation versions?Whose version did you like the best?Which parts of the poem are serious?Funny?

  • Create an alphabetical glossary that defines and illustrates the use of each invented word in Jabberwocky. This assignment can be found on page 355 of your textbook.

  • Poetry Vocabulary List 1Beguiling- tricking; charmingDesolate-deserted; abandonedLanguid- drooping; weakBafflement- puzzlement; bewildermentChortled- made a jolly, chuckling soundDiverged- branched out in different directions

  • List One Continued7. Pallid- paleDepravity- crookedness; corruptionRespite- rest; reliefQuaint- strange; unusual (in an old-fashioned way)

  • Some types of poetryLyricSonnetOdeNarrativeBalladEpicHaikuLimerickElegy (see handout)Epigram (see handout)

  • What is a lyric poem?A lyric poem is highly emotional in nature.It expresses the thoughts and feelings of the poetLyric poetry has a musical feel to it and may resemble a songExamples from your book:

    The Eagle, by Alfred, Lord Tennyson(page 796)

  • Two Types of Lyric Poetry Ode-Serious and thoughtful with a precise, formal structure.

    Sonnet- 14 lines long, divided into two groups; English and Italian. (see handout for terms)English- als

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