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  • Slide 1
  • The Early Middle Ages Germanic Invasion Notes
  • Slide 2
  • Objectives 1. The student will demonstrate knowledge of Western Europe during the Middle Ages from about 500 to 1000 C.E. in terms of its impact on Western civilization by 1. Sequencing events related to the invasions, settlements, and influence of migratory groups, including the Angles, Saxons, Magyars, and Vikings 2. Sequencing events related to the spread of Christianity and the Catholic Church throughout Europe 3. Explaining the rise of the Frankish kings, the Age of Charlemagne, and the revival of the idea of the Roman Empire Essential Questions How did invasions by the Angle, Saxons, Magyars, and Vikings influence the development of Europe? How and why did the Church grow in importance in the Middle Ages How did Charlemagne revive the idea of the Roman Empire?
  • Slide 3
  • Barbarian Invasions Areas of Settlement Angles/Saxons Came from Continental Europe Settled in England Magyars Came from Central Asia Settled in Hungary Vikings Came from Scandinavia Many settled in Russia
  • Slide 4
  • Slide 5
  • Invasions drastically change Europe 5 consequences Disruption of Trade Downfall of Cities Population Shifts Decline of Learning Loss of a common language
  • Slide 6
  • Disruption of Trade Merchants faced invasions from both land and sea, which led to their businesses collapsing. The breakdown of trade destroyed Europes cities as economic centers. Money became scarce.
  • Slide 7
  • Downfall of Cities With the fall of the Roman Empire, cities were abandoned as centers of administration
  • Slide 8
  • Population Shifts As Roman centers of trade and government collapsed, nobles retreated to the rural areas and cities were left without strong leadership. Other city dwellers also fled to the countryside, where they grew their own food. The population of western Europe became mostly rural.
  • Slide 9
  • Decline of Learning The Germanic invaders could not read or write and only Roman church officials continued to be literate. Knowledge of Greek was almost lost and few people could read Greek works of literature, science, and philosophy. The Germanic tribes had a rich oral tradition of songs and legends, just no written language.
  • Slide 10
  • Loss of a Common Language As German-speaking peoples mixed with the Roman population, Latin began to change and was no longer understood from region to region. By the 800s, French, Spanish, and other Romance languages had evolved from Latin.
  • Slide 11
  • Germanic Kingdoms Emerge Between 400- 600 C.E. Germanic Kingdoms replace Roman provinces Borders constantly changing Church only source of stability New concept of Government Family ties and personal loyalty most important Small communities Governed by unwritten rules and traditions
  • Slide 12
  • The Franks Former Roman province of Gaul (France) Clovis 496 C.E. led army against warring Germanic tribe Fearing defeat prayed to the Christian God Franks won and Clovis converted to Christianity (as well as his soldiers) The church supported Clovis 511 C.E. Clovis united the Franks into one kingdom
  • Slide 13
  • Germanic Christianity By 600 C.E. many Germanic people Christian Rulers and missionaries helped spread religion Spreads to England Monasteries and Convents Built to adapt to rural conditions Saint Benedict 520 C.E. Benedictine rule Benedictines most influential monastic order Most educated, preserved history Preserved Greco-Roman cultural achievements Gregory I (The Great) Became Pope in 590 C.E. Broadened role of the church Became secular, involved in worldly affairs such as politics Idea of a churchly kingdom of Europe ruled by the Pope Made church administration more efficient Endorsed missionaries Supported Benedictine rule
  • Slide 14
  • Slide 15
  • The Frankish Empire Franks controlled largest kingdom in Europe Clovis created the Merovingian dynasty Near Paris, defeated rival groups 486-507 C.E. Successors weak rulers Charles Martel 719 C.E. Mayor of the palace More power than King Battle of Tours 732 C.E. Defeated invading Muslim army Became Christian hero Passed power to his son Pepin the Short Cooperated with Pope Fought for the church and became the King Created Carolingian Dynasty Wife big-footed Bertha
  • Slide 16
  • Slide 17
  • Charlemagne Pepin died in 768 C.E. Charlemagne (Charles the Great) Empire Greatest since Ancient Rome Conquered lands through military victory Spread Christianity through conquests Reunited Western Europe Pope Leo III crowned him Emperor in 800 C.E. He needed a strong powerful leader for Western Europe Called himself a Roman Emperor Linked Carolingian Monarchy with Church
  • Slide 18
  • Slide 19
  • Charlemagnes Rule Government Limited authority of nobles Strengthened central authority Used Royal agents to report on countryside Regularly participated in his kingdoms affairs Culture Roman culture was reinterpreted Encouraged learning Opened a palace school Built schools, churches and roads to unite the empire Ordered monasteries to open schools to train monks and priests Monasteries expanded their libraries
  • Slide 20
  • The end of an Empire Charlemagne crowned his son Louis the Pious king in 814 C.E. Religious man Ineffective ruler Louis heirs Three sons Fought civil war Treaty of Verdun in 843 C.E. split kingdom New system of government and landholding evolved Unifying effect of Charlemagne never died
  • Slide 21
  • Objectives 1. The student will demonstrate knowledge of Western Europe during the Middle Ages from about 500 to 1000 C.E. in terms of its impact on Western civilization by 1. Sequencing events related to the invasions, settlements, and influence of migratory groups, including the Angles, Saxons, Magyars, and Vikings 2. Sequencing events related to the spread of Christianity and the Catholic Church throughout Europe 3. Explaining the rise of the Frankish kings, the Age of Charlemagne, and the revival of the idea of the Roman Empire Essential Questions How did invasions by the Angle, Saxons, Magyars, and Vikings influence the development of Europe? How and why did the Church grow in importance in the Middle Ages How did Charlemagne revive the idea of the Roman Empire?

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